Fibre East 2013 and Other Yarn Thoughts

This weekend  has been wall-to-wall yarn for me. On Saturday, I went to the last event this summer where I was selling my yarn. It was a local High Street event and although for some mysterious reason unfathomable to anyone except the decision makers at the Borough Council, my stall was neither on the High Street nor anywhere near the other craft related stalls, I had some wonderful visitors and met some new customers. As a small start-up that is what it’s all about after all!

It was a glorious summer day and I shared the end of the row with this:

Jpeg

Not exactly yarn, but very interesting to see the different ways children related to it. Some (mostly girls) wanted to touch and feel the turf. Others (mostly boys) wanted to look inside the car, touch the tyres and lights – the bits which were still car-like, to see whether it was a real car. I thought it was very interesting. As I mused about it, I realised that is how people who come to my stand tend to behave too. Most women are drawn by the tactile nature of yarn and of course the colour. However there are definitely some who are engineers of knitting and focus on a very narrow range of yarn to produce a very specific project they have in mind. I am most definitely the browser and toucher.

And if I needed any confirmation at all, this was confirmed to me by my Sunday trip to Fibre East 2013. Since it’s a 15 minute drive away, wild horses couldn’t keep me away and it’s been in the diary for quite a while. I took my younger son with me to keep me in check and to show him things of course! I think sharing the tactile experience makes it even more enjoyable. We browsed and touched and ooh-ed and aah-ed and tried and chatted and did a lot more of feeling a lot more yarn. I loved every tactile minute. The first hour or so I was so excited I forgot to take pictures. However, here’s a few to help those who couldn’t make this event visualise the experience.

The Colourful Sparkle Duck

The Elegant Muted Colours of British wool

Jpeg

The Wonderful Ladies on The Saori Shed who actively allowed my son to weave fabric!

Jpeg

A loom is now on the Christmas list!

I made a few heart-felt purchases. And as a result I am in a total quandary. What would you make with these?

50g Alpaca Silk Lace weight

50g Alpaca Silk Lace weight

Superwash Blue-faced Leicester 200g sock yarn

Superwash Blue-faced Leicester 200g sock yarn

50% Baby Camel, 50% Silk Lace weight 70g

50% Baby Camel, 50% Silk Lace weight 70g

Yarn no. 1 is from The Mulberry Dyer and is a much more intense and vibrant yellow than the photo.

Yarn no. 2 is from Freyalyn’s Hand-dyed Fibres and again is a more intense tweed-flecked, gently undulating shades of green, far too good for socks, yarn.

Yarn no. 3 is my guilty pleasure. Baby camel! Silk!  Beads! Discreet metallic yarn! The colours are all shades of blue towards the lilac and sea green ends of the colour chart. Whatever I’m going to use it for, it will have to be very special. Thank you Hill Top Cloud for creating it.

Do let me know if you have any pattern ideas please.

Unfortunately I also succumbed to the spinning bug and bought some wool to spin – never having tried this before. No idea what type of spindle I should try and of course ran out of time to buy one at Fibre East. Again, any advice would really be appreciated.

a cloud of blues

a cloud of blues

And finally, I really need to mention Felt 4 You who were running a stall selling silk items and felted slippers in the most beautiful designs created by producers in Central Asia. My two needed slippers for the autumn and although I’ve always made these for them myself,  now that they both compete on which one of them will over-take my feet size first, it’s no fun knitting and felting slippers the size of small boats. These slipper clogs are really well-made and sturdy as well as light and fun! Check them out as they have a shop on their website.

Jpeg

I hope you all had a fantastic weekend. Don’t forget you have one week to follow me to be in with a chance to win my Give-Away, just over a month to enter the Make-a-Monster Competition and only 5 months to go to make those Christmas presents!

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About monsteryarns

I am a yarn enthusiast and knitter. And I am incredibly fortunate to use both in my home business as a quality yarn retailer and knitting coach.
This entry was posted in British wool, colour, Competition, Craft, Felting, Fibre East 2013, Knitting, Make-a-Monster, self-patterning yarn, self-striping yarn, Spinning, texture, wool, Yarn and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to Fibre East 2013 and Other Yarn Thoughts

  1. Hannie says:

    It was lovely to see your stall – it was a real shame that yours was up Mill Street – it kind of didn’t make sense – I couldn’t understand why they didn’t move the stall right up to the kerbs and try and fit in a second row on the actual High St – or maybe put the animals in that bit and then all the craft stands in the High Street itself :( We did pop by but you were deep in conversation so didn’t really stop. I really liked the finished pieces that were on display – they were good for ideas :D

    That green one is lovely! I love the slippers too! They must be really warm. I need to put my slippers through the wash while it’s warm enough to dry them properly!

    • monsteryarns says:

      I was milking every customer for maximum impact! The whole thing was really disappointing as I signed up to do this in March to get known. I was so hidden not many new customers came. And I was only told a week before the event that there were a change of plans and I was being put on Mill St.
      The slippers are great and should last quite a while. I can reshape them for several sizes as the boys’ feet grow!
      I’m really taken with all my yarn. Just not sure when and what I can make…Come and see them. So much better in real life.

  2. daniellajoe says:

    the last one 50% baby camel and silk WOW!! i love it!! I have never even heard of that blend… I would like to make a “fine” blouse, that is definitely “high class” :-) I hope you have better luck next time I hope they give you a credit for changing plans at the last minute….

    • monsteryarns says:

      It is soooo soft. It is really special but there isn’t that much of it. Small lacy scarf I think but just don’t know about a pattern.

      The stall thing still really makes me angry. I must just learn to let go.

  3. I love yarn no. 1!! I think that’s a shawl.
    The fiber you bought is beautiful as well. Such a pretty blue! Your bug has wonderful taste. ;) I’m curious though…Do you know what kind of wool it is?

    • monsteryarns says:

      Thanks :)
      It is sheep wool but don’t remember the breed. It is quite soft and has no “bits” in it. Sorry – don’t yet have the right technical lingo!

      • Oh, that’s okay. :) It looks like a great fiber to start with.Although I am of the mind that you should start with whatever fiber it is that excites you, I think some fibers are a bit trickier to start with than others. But sheep wools are usually pretty cool to get off on the right foot depending on how well it’s processed. They’re very forgiving. Yours sounds like it was processed well without any vm in it. Good for you choosing your first fiber!

      • monsteryarns says:

        Thank you. Just need a drop spindle.

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